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24 October 2012
Summer babies not so successful

Researchers at the University of British Columbia say that a person's date of birth can affect their success in the corporate world. Their analysis of corporate success and birthdates shows that only 6 percent of big company CEOs were born in June and also July. By comparison, people born in March and April represented 13 percent and 11 percent respectively.

"Our findings indicate that summer babies underperform in the ranks of CEOs as a result of the 'birth-date effect,' a phenomenon resulting from the way children are grouped by age in school," says Prof. Maurice Levi, co-author of the study which appears in the journal Economics Letters.

In the U.S., cut-off dates for school admission fall between September and January. The researchers determined that those CEOs in the sample born between June and July were the youngest in their class and those in March and April were the oldest.

"Older children within the same grade tend to do better than the youngest, who are less intellectually developed," explains Levi. "Early success is often rewarded with leadership roles and enriched learning opportunities, leading to future advantages that are magnified throughout life."

"Our study adds to the growing evidence that the way our education system groups students by age impacts their lifelong success," he added. "We could be excluding some of the business world's best talent simply by enrolling them in school too early."

Related:
Discuss this article in our forum
Children's potentials crushed by poverty
Neglect cripples infant brain growth
Season Of Birth May Be Factor In Infant Growth

Source: University of British Columbia


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