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28 June 2012
Dietary fiber found to boost healthy gut bacteria

A new study from the University of Illinois shows that dietary fiber promotes a shift in the gut toward different types of beneficial bacteria. The findings are important as scientists now know that a healthy gastrointestinal tract affects our susceptibility to conditions such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, colon cancer, and autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.

In the study, 20 healthy subjects with an average fiber intake of 14 grams a day were given snack bars to supplement their diet. The control group received bars that contained no fiber; a second group ate bars that contained 21 grams of polydextrose, which is a common fiber food additive; and a third group received bars with 21 grams of soluble corn fiber.

After several weeks, fecal samples were collected from the participants and the researchers used the microbial DNA they obtained to identify which bacteria were present. They found that both types of fiber affected the abundance of bacteria at the phyla, genus, and species level. When soluble corn fiber was consumed, Lactobacillus, often used as a probiotic for its beneficial effects on the gut, increased. Faecalibacterium populations rose in the groups consuming both types of fiber.

As these microbes ferment fiber in the intestine, short-chain fatty acids and other metabolites are produced, resulting in many health benefits for the host, said researcher Kelly Swanson. "When we understand what kinds of fiber best nurture these health-promoting bacteria, we should be able to modify imbalances to support and improve gastrointestinal health. Unfortunately, people eat only about half of the 30 to 35 grams of daily fiber that is recommended. To achieve these health benefits, consumers should read nutrition labels and choose foods that have high fiber content."

Related:
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Few Drawbacks To Following Low-Fat, High-Fiber Diet
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Source: University of Illinois


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