Women's health discussion
forums, research news and
women's health issues.
DISCUSSION FORUMS...

Trying To Conceive

Surviving Miscarriage

Overcoming Infertility

Reproductive Health

General Health

Contraception

Pregnancy

Parenting

Babies and Toddlers

Relationships

Mental Health

Diet & Weight


ARTICLES ABOUT...

Relationships

Sexual Dysfunction

Looking Good

STDs

Men

Contraception

Reproductive Health

Conceiving

Pregnancy

Incontinence

Mental Health

Children's Health

Eating Well

Healthy Living

Supplements

Menopause

Weight Issues

Breast Cancer

Custom Search

3 May 2012
Beta-carotene warning

Researchers from Ohio State University say there could be health hazards associated with consuming too much beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is a naturally occurring pigment that gives color to foods such as carrots, sweet potatoes and certain greens. It is an antioxidant and converts to vitamin A in the body.

Now, scientists at Ohio State University have found that certain molecules that derive from beta-carotene have an opposite effect in the body: they actually block some actions of vitamin A, which is critical to human vision, bone and skin health, metabolism and immune function.

Because these molecules derive from beta-carotene, researchers predict that a large amount of this antioxidant is accompanied by a larger amount of these anti-vitamin-A molecules, as well.

Previous research established that when beta-carotene is metabolized, it is broken in half by an enzyme, which produces two vitamin A molecules. In this new study, the researchers showed that some of these molecules are produced when beta-carotene is broken in a different place by processes that are not yet fully understood and act to antagonize vitamin A.

The new findings might explain the outcome of a decades-old clinical trial that has left scientists puzzled for years. In that trial, people at high risk for lung cancer - smokers and asbestos workers - were given massive doses of beta-carotene over a long period of time in an attempt to lower that risk. The trial ended early because more supplemented participants developed cancer than did those who received no beta-carotene.

"Those trials are still sending shockwaves 20 years later to the scientific community," said Earl Harrison, an investigator at Ohio State's Comprehensive Cancer Center. "What we found provides a plausible explanation of why larger amounts of beta-carotene might have led to unexpected effects in these trials."

Related:
Discuss this article in our forum
Dietary supplements making people less healthy?
Danger of free radicals overestimated
Antioxidants: When Too Much Of A Good Thing Can Kill You

Source: Ohio State University


Discussion Forums     About Us     Privacy
Your use of this website indicates your agreement to our terms of use.
2002 - 2013 Aphrodite Women's Health and its licensors. All rights reserved.