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2 November 2010
Antibiotic impact on gut flora underestimated

Short courses of antibiotics can leave normal gut bacteria harboring antibiotic resistance genes for up to two years after treatment, suggesting that the long-term effects of antibiotic therapy are far more significant than previously thought. The new findings appear in the latest issue of Microbiology.

The impact of antibiotics on the normal gut flora has previously been thought to be short-term, with any disturbances being restored several weeks after treatment. However, the new review into the long-term impacts of antibiotic therapy reveals that this is not always the case. Studies have shown that high levels of resistance genes can be detected in gut microbes after just 7 days of antibiotic treatment and that these genes remain present for up to two years even if the individual has taken no further antibiotics.

The consequences of this could be potentially life-threatening explained Dr Cecilia Jernberg from the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control who conducted the study. "The long-term presence of resistance genes in human gut bacteria dramatically increases the probability of them being transferred to and exploited by harmful bacteria that pass through the gut. This could reduce the success of future antibiotic treatments and potentially lead to new strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria."

Jernberg says the review highlights the necessity of using antibiotics prudently. "Antibiotic resistance is not a new problem and there is a growing battle with multi-drug resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria. The development of new antibiotics is slow and so we must use the effective drugs we have left with care."

Related:
Honey More Effective Than Antibiotics
Poultry Products Increase Antibiotic Resistance
Enough Antibiotics Already, Say Medicos
Breast Cancer Risk Linked To Long-Term Antibiotic Use

Source: Society for General Microbiology


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