Women's health discussion
forums, research news and
women's health issues.
DISCUSSION FORUMS...

Trying To Conceive

Surviving Miscarriage

Overcoming Infertility

Reproductive Health

General Health

Contraception

Pregnancy

Parenting

Babies and Toddlers

Relationships

Mental Health

Diet & Weight


ARTICLES ABOUT...

Relationships

Sexual Dysfunction

Looking Good

STDs

Men

Contraception

Reproductive Health

Conceiving

Pregnancy

Incontinence

Mental Health

Children's Health

Eating Well

Healthy Living

Supplements

Menopause

Weight Issues

Breast Cancer

Custom Search

6 April 2010
Fees rocket for "desirable" egg donors

Many egg donation agencies and private couples routinely exceed compensation recommendation limits for potential donors, a new study from the Georgia Institute of Technology has found. Additionally, around one-quarter of the ads for eggs listed specific requirements for potential donors, such as appearance or ethnicity. The study also found that each increase of 100 SAT points in the average for a university increased the compensation offered to egg donors at that school by $2,350.

From a sample of over 300 college newspapers, the study revealed that almost one-quarter of advertisements offered payment in excess of $10,000, a violation of guidelines issued by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). Requirements for appearance or ethnicity are also against ASRM guidelines, which prohibit linking compensation to donor personal characteristics.

Of the advertisements violating ASRM guidelines, many offered $20,000, several offered $35,000, and one was as high as $50,000. Current ASRM guidelines recommend that sums of $5,000 or more require justification and sums above $10,000 are not appropriate.

The extent to which compensation limits are appropriate remains an open question, says researcher Aaron D. Levine, who suggests verifying donor agency compliance (which is currently self-reported) or changing the format of advertisements.

But in a related commentary, John A. Robertson, of the University of Texas, argues against greater regulation, and calls the current guidelines into question themselves. "After all, we allow individuals to choose their mates and sperm donors on the basis of such characteristics," he writes. "Why not choose egg donors similarly?"

Related:
New egg assessment method
Questions Raised Over Fertility Clinic Advertising
Sex Selection Before IVF Implantation Likely To Be Popular

Source: Georgia Institute of Technology


Discussion Forums     About Us     Privacy
Your use of this website indicates your agreement to our terms of use.
2002 - 2013 Aphrodite Women's Health and its licensors. All rights reserved.