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28 July 2008
Nutritionist Fingers Fructose As Obesity Culprit

People on low-carbohydrate diets may lose weight chiefly because they reduce their intake of fructose, a type of sugar that can be made into body fat very quickly, according to a UT Southwestern Medical Center researcher. UT's Elizabeth Parks writes in the Journal of Nutrition that the type of carbohydrates a person eats may be just as important in weight control as the number of calories a person eats.

"Our study shows for the first time the surprising speed with which humans make body fat from fructose," Parks said. "Fructose, glucose and sucrose, which is a mixture of fructose and glucose, are all forms of sugar but are metabolized differently. All three can be made into triglycerides, a form of body fat; however, once you start the process of fat synthesis from fructose, it's hard to slow it down."

In humans, triglycerides are predominantly formed in the liver, which acts like a "traffic cop" to coordinate the use of dietary sugars. It is the liver's job, when it encounters glucose, to decide whether the body needs to store the glucose as glycogen, burn it for energy or turn the glucose into triglycerides. When there's a lot of glucose to process, it is put aside to process later. Fructose, on the other hand, enters this metabolic pathway downstream, bypassing the traffic cop and flooding the metabolic pathway.

"It's basically sneaking into the rock concert through the fence," Parks said. "It's a less-controlled movement of fructose through these pathways that causes it to contribute to greater triglyceride synthesis. The bottom line of this study is that fructose very quickly gets made into fat in the body."

Though fructose, a monosaccharide, or simple sugar, is naturally found in high levels in fruit, it is also added to many processed foods. Fructose is perhaps best known for its presence in the sweetener called high-fructose corn syrup or HFCS, which is typically 55 percent fructose and 45 percent glucose, similar to the mix that can be found in fruits. It has become the preferred sweetener for many food manufacturers because it is generally cheaper, sweeter and easier to blend into beverages than table sugar.

"The message from this study is powerful because body fat synthesis was measured immediately after the sweet drinks were consumed," Parks said. "The carbohydrates came into the body as sugars, the liver took the molecules apart like tinker toys, and put them back together to build fats. All this happened within four hours after the fructose drink. As a result, when the next meal was eaten, the lunch fat was more likely to be stored than burned.

"This is an underestimate of the effect of fructose because these individuals consumed the drinks while fasting and because the subjects were healthy, lean and could presumably process the fructose pretty quickly. Fat synthesis from sugars may be worse in people who are overweight or obese because this process may be already revved up," Parks concluded.

Related:
Different Dietary Needs For Men And Women
You Aren't What You Eat
How Low-Carb Diets Suppress Hunger
Salty Foods Creating Soft Drink Junkies
More Evidence For Fructose Obesity Link

Source: University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center


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