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7 November 2007
Diet And Dementia, An Intimate Relationship

Dietary patterns practiced during adulthood are important contributors to age-related cognitive decline and dementia risk, says a study in the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. The new findings highlight the benefits of diets high in fruit, vegetables, cereals and fish and low in saturated fats. The researchers noted that adults with diabetes are especially sensitive to the foods they eat with respect to cognitive function. Specifically, an adult with diabetes will experience a decline in memory function after a meal, especially if simple carbohydrate foods are consumed.

Such a deficit can be prevented through healthful food choices at meals, says the study, suggesting that weight maintenance reduces the risk of developing obesity-associated disorders, such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, and is an important component of preserving cognitive health.

The work shows another benefit of maintaining healthful eating practices with aging. "This type of information should be able to empower the individual, knowing that he/she can be actively engaged in activities and lifestyles that should support cognitive health with aging," says Carol Greenwood, author of the study.

Related articles:
Exercise Intellect To Avoid Dementia
Is Dementia Infectious?
Alzheimer's Drug May Hinder, Rather Than Help

Source: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences


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